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Why dignity is central to telecare

​The annual opportunity for health and social care workers, and members of the public to uphold people’s rights to dignity.

The dictionary definition of the word dignity is: the state or quality of being worthy of honour or respect. Unfortunately, too many people in our society live without it, especially true for those who need it the most, including the elderly or vulnerable. However, thanks to the actions of the NHS, community services, care homes and home support services there is a growing emphasis on dignity in care.

Close up of elderly person holding hands

Dignity Action Day takes place today (1st February) and is an annual opportunity for health and social care workers, and members of the public to uphold people’s rights to dignity and provide a truly memorable day for people who use care services.

Organised by National Dignity Council, which counts Baroness Joan Bakewell as its ambassador, the day aims to give everyone the opportunity to contribute to upholding people’s rights to dignity and provide a truly memorable day for people receiving care. Dignity Action Day aims to ensure people who use care services are treated as individuals and are given choice, control and a sense of purpose in their daily lives.

Baroness Bakewell says: “Dignity Action Day highlights a more respectful way of behaving towards vulnerable people. The very old and the very young clearly need our respect, but it wouldn’t do any harm to spread the dignity message across the population then we can all benefit.”

The organisers of Dignity Action Day say the event will:

  • Raise awareness of the importance of Dignity in Care
  • Provide someone with an extra special day
  • Demonstrate that everybody in the community has a role to play in upholding Dignity in Care
  • Remind the public that staff have a right to be treated with dignity and respect too
  • Provide a great community networking opportunity.

For Welbeing, dignity in care is one of its core principles.

Principles

The Eastbourne-based company’s telecare personal lifeline alarm service allows those people who may have been in full time or part time care the chance to live in their own homes and to live in dignity.

The home unit simply connects to the telephone line, and works with a pendant. Once you press the button you come through to our friendly contact centre, open 24 hours a day, who will assess the situation and connect you straight away to the emergency services or friends and family if needed.

Late last year, Welbeing was featured as headline news on BBC Radio Norfolk. The show featured callers who already have the system outlining how secure they felt knowing it was there. And a lady called Debra, who works in Welbeing’s Dereham contact centre, told how vital the work of Welbeing is. She told listeners: “Through the alarm line we laugh with people; we cry with people. We are there because we care and we know that for some you are the only people they will speak to that day.”

People who choose Welbeing benefit from:

  • Specially trained, friendly team who can provide the assistance you need, whenever you need it.
  • There for you 24 hours a day, 365 days-a-year at the press of a button.
  • Accredited to the highest industry level: Telecare Services Association Platinum.

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